Fuel injection

08/08/2020
image

Fuel injection is the introduction of fuel in an internal combustion engine, most commonly automotive engines, by the means of an injector.

All compression-ignition (diesel) engines use fuel injection, and many Spark-ignition engines use fuel injection of one kind or another. In automobile engines, fuel injection was first volume-produced in the late 1960s, and gradually gained prevalence until it had largely replaced carburetors by the early 1990s.[1] The primary difference between carburetion and fuel injection is that fuel injection atomizes the fuel through a small nozzle under high pressure, while a carburetor relies on suction created by intake air accelerated through a Venturi tube to draw the fuel into the airstream.

The central task of a fuel injection system is to supply the correct amount of fuel for the combustion process inside an engine. System design and configuration affects and takes account of a variety of factors, including:

System cost
Engine performance and vehicle driveability (ease of starting, smooth running, etc)
exhaust emissions
Diagnostic provisions and ease of service
Fuel efficiency
Reliability
Ability to run on various fuels